Michael Massing, The War We Aren’t Debating

The war on drugs has sown misery across a vast swath of territory stretching from the coca fields of Peru to Mexico’s border with the United States. Billions have been spent on crop eradication, commando units, military training, unmanned surveillance drones, and helicopters. All the while, drugs continue to flow unabated into the United States. In 2010, 1.64 million people were arrested for drug violations—80 percent of them for possession. Exposing the madness of the US drug war is the aim of the new documentary ‘The House I Live In.’ Michael Massing on the film, and the changing political climate for legalization.

Photo: A soldier guarding a marijuana plantation discovered during military operations in northern Mexico, January 30, 2012 (Marco Ugarte/AP)

Michael Massing, The War We Aren’t Debating

The war on drugs has sown misery across a vast swath of territory stretching from the coca fields of Peru to Mexico’s border with the United States. Billions have been spent on crop eradication, commando units, military training, unmanned surveillance drones, and helicopters. All the while, drugs continue to flow unabated into the United States. In 2010, 1.64 million people were arrested for drug violations—80 percent of them for possession. Exposing the madness of the US drug war is the aim of the new documentary ‘The House I Live In.’ Michael Massing on the film, and the changing political climate for legalization.

Photo: A soldier guarding a marijuana plantation discovered during military operations in northern Mexico, January 30, 2012 (Marco Ugarte/AP)