John Gray, The Violent Visions of Slavoj Žižek

Few thinkers illustrate the contradictions of contemporary capitalism better than the Slovenian philosopher and cultural theorist Slavoj Žižek. The financial and economic crisis has demonstrated the fragility of the free market system that its defenders believed had triumphed in the cold war; but there is no sign of anything resembling the socialist project that in the past was seen by many as embodying capitalism’s successor. Žižek’s work, which reflects this paradoxical situation in a number of ways, has made him one of the world’s best-known public intellectuals.

Photo: Slavoj Žižek at his apartment in Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2010 (Reiner Riedler/Anzenberger/Redux)

John Gray, The Violent Visions of Slavoj Žižek

Few thinkers illustrate the contradictions of contemporary capitalism better than the Slovenian philosopher and cultural theorist Slavoj Žižek. The financial and economic crisis has demonstrated the fragility of the free market system that its defenders believed had triumphed in the cold war; but there is no sign of anything resembling the socialist project that in the past was seen by many as embodying capitalism’s successor. Žižek’s work, which reflects this paradoxical situation in a number of ways, has made him one of the world’s best-known public intellectuals.

Photo: Slavoj Žižek at his apartment in Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2010 (Reiner Riedler/Anzenberger/Redux)