Ethiopian protesters may be leading Africa’s most promising and important nonviolent human rights campaign since the anti-apartheid struggle. Yet the United States has stood by as women and men have been hideously beaten by police, hundreds have been arrested, eight people have been killed, mosques have been raided by security forces, and twenty-nine Muslim leaders, including lawyers, professors, and businessmen, remain in jail.

Obama: Failing the African Spring?
by Helen Epstein

Photo: Ethiopian Muslims protesting in Addis Ababa, October, 2012 (Awolia School Support Page)

Ethiopian protesters may be leading Africa’s most promising and important nonviolent human rights campaign since the anti-apartheid struggle. Yet the United States has stood by as women and men have been hideously beaten by police, hundreds have been arrested, eight people have been killed, mosques have been raided by security forces, and twenty-nine Muslim leaders, including lawyers, professors, and businessmen, remain in jail.

Obama: Failing the African Spring?
by Helen Epstein

Photo: Ethiopian Muslims protesting in Addis Ababa, October, 2012 (Awolia School Support Page)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft, The Truth About Murdoch

Along with the other media he has mastered, from tabloids to satellite television, Rupert Murdoch has recently taken to Twitter. On February 15, he tweeted, “To hell with politicians! When are we going to find some to tell the truth in any country? Don’t hold your breath.” His words remind us yet again that Murdoch is a man of iron nerve, not say brass neck, though they might also suggest a degree of delusion. Throughout his career, every time he has come near calamity, that gambler’s strong nerve has always somehow managed to rescue him. But the concatenation of scandal and disaster that has now engulfed his News International group—which owns the Sun and the now-defunct News of the World as well as the London Times and other papers—is of a different order. The first stories about phone-hacking have proved to be merely the start, and every time Murdoch has appeared to regain the upper hand, new revelations have only deepened the crisis.

(Photo: Stuart Franklin/Magnum Photos, 1988)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft, The Truth About Murdoch

Along with the other media he has mastered, from tabloids to satellite television, Rupert Murdoch has recently taken to Twitter. On February 15, he tweeted, “To hell with politicians! When are we going to find some to tell the truth in any country? Don’t hold your breath.” His words remind us yet again that Murdoch is a man of iron nerve, not say brass neck, though they might also suggest a degree of delusion. Throughout his career, every time he has come near calamity, that gambler’s strong nerve has always somehow managed to rescue him. But the concatenation of scandal and disaster that has now engulfed his News International group—which owns the Sun and the now-defunct News of the World as well as the London Times and other papers—is of a different order. The first stories about phone-hacking have proved to be merely the start, and every time Murdoch has appeared to regain the upper hand, new revelations have only deepened the crisis.

(Photo: Stuart Franklin/Magnum Photos, 1988)