During the many lengthy shots of the scenic British countryside in the latest Wuthering Heights, directed by the British filmmaker Andrea Arnold, I found myself wondering how anyone could have been convinced that what the culture needed was yet another cinematic treatment of Emily Brontë’s novel. If one counts feature films, foreign adaptations, and TV mini-series, audiences have had more than twenty opportunities to watch Brontë’s doomed lovers race across the wind-swept moors. Then, about an hour into the newest version, it struck me: it’s ‘Twilight!’

Francine Prose, The Taming of Wuthering Heights

Photo: Kaya Scodelario in Andrea Arnold’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ (2011) (Oscilloscope Laboratories)

During the many lengthy shots of the scenic British countryside in the latest Wuthering Heights, directed by the British filmmaker Andrea Arnold, I found myself wondering how anyone could have been convinced that what the culture needed was yet another cinematic treatment of Emily Brontë’s novel. If one counts feature films, foreign adaptations, and TV mini-series, audiences have had more than twenty opportunities to watch Brontë’s doomed lovers race across the wind-swept moors. Then, about an hour into the newest version, it struck me: it’s ‘Twilight!’

Francine Prose, The Taming of Wuthering Heights

Photo: Kaya Scodelario in Andrea Arnold’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ (2011) (Oscilloscope Laboratories)

  1. theredshoes reblogged this from nybooks and added:
    I seriously don’t see how you can film Wuthering Heights anyway. It’s all frame narratives and unreliable narrators and...
  2. lerivan reblogged this from nybooks
  3. fluipmotion reblogged this from nybooks
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