J. Hoberman, Trapped in the Total Cinema

Can we speak of a twenty-first-century cinema? Save for the introduction of synchronous sound, the motion picture apparatus remained markedly consistent for a hundred years. But The Matrix (1999) introduced a radical impurity by combining live action with frame-by-frame digital manipulation. Computer generated imagery has precluded the necessity of having the world, or even a really existing subject, before the camera—let alone the need for a camera.

Photo: The Matrix, 1999 (Warner Bros. Pictures)

J. Hoberman, Trapped in the Total Cinema

Can we speak of a twenty-first-century cinema? Save for the introduction of synchronous sound, the motion picture apparatus remained markedly consistent for a hundred years. But The Matrix (1999) introduced a radical impurity by combining live action with frame-by-frame digital manipulation. Computer generated imagery has precluded the necessity of having the world, or even a really existing subject, before the camera—let alone the need for a camera.

Photo: The Matrix, 1999 (Warner Bros. Pictures)

  1. ikaristwin reblogged this from nybooks
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    Sometimes I feel like I’m the only person in the world who thought The Matrix was a good movie.
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    I didn’t care for the film, but I see why it did change cinema.
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