Slavs and Tatars, When Satire Conquered Iran

With an acerbic sense of humor and realist illustrations reminiscent of Daumier or Toulouse-Lautrec, the satirical magazine Molla Nasreddin (1906–1930) attacked the hypocrisy of the Muslim clergy, while arguing for Westernization, educational reform, and equal rights for women. It would become the most influential and perhaps first publication of its kind to be read across the Muslim world, from Morocco to India.

Slavs and Tatars, When Satire Conquered Iran

With an acerbic sense of humor and realist illustrations reminiscent of Daumier or Toulouse-Lautrec, the satirical magazine Molla Nasreddin (1906–1930) attacked the hypocrisy of the Muslim clergy, while arguing for Westernization, educational reform, and equal rights for women. It would become the most influential and perhaps first publication of its kind to be read across the Muslim world, from Morocco to India.

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  16. akio reblogged this from obliquecity and added:
    Also about Nasreddin himself looks interesting. 13th century Sufi. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nasreddin
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  19. somersaultmag reblogged this from nybooks and added:
    Fabulous.
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